Review: Driven

Review: Driven

Driven by Fred Alvrez

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My Rating

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Official synopsis

She’s young, beautiful, and living a life of the idle rich in Los Angeles. Mia Turner appears to have it all. Then on what starts out as a normal Rodeo Drive shopping trip, she gets into an autonomous cab to take her handbag dog to the vet. But someone has hacked her vehicle and there’s no escape, no one to hear her scream.

A grueling cross-country trip follows, but it’s not only the hijacked cab she wants to escape. Disturbing childhood memories feed her nightmares during the trip from hell, and a kidnapper’s hidden agenda may help or hinder her – she doesn’t know which. 


Review

Driven was definitely the fun, fast-paced, page turner I expected it to be. I was intrigued by the synopsis of the book because it promised a thrilling ride that begins in Los Angeles and ends on the east coast. Being a native, born-and-raised, LA girl, I was all-in. Despite the fact that the majority of the book takes place in a cab, I was eagerly turning the pages, invested in what was happening.

I did enjoy this book. I didn't love it nor did I hate it, but it was "okay" for me. I read it in one sitting because I just wanted to keep going till the end, and it did prove to be an enjoyable read. The ending/big reveal wasn't my favorite, probably because I had already come up with more exciting potential scenarios in my own head prior to that point, and I think I hyped myself up for it to be more of a twist than what it really was.

My issue with this book was, unfortunately, with the main character. Mia was made out to be a stereotypical Beverly Hills girl that lacked any critical thinking unless it came to shopping. I really should have known after having read "Rodeo Drive" and "handbag dog" in the synopsis. She lacked any depth and I would literally cringe through the majority of the first half of the book because she was just written and created to so obviously be what people think LA/Beverly Hills girls are. And then somewhere 60% or so of the way through, she decides to put on her big girl pants and has a total 180 shift in her character and we're expected to believe that she is, all of a sudden, a survivalist who tries to use whatever she can at her disposal, despite her lacking all signs of intelligence or caring for anything besides those things that come attached with dollar signs.

I received this book through BookSirens in exchange for my honest review. 

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