Review: Snow Job

Review: Snow Job

Snow Job: The Great Game by Jenni Ferchenko

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My Rating

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Official synopsis

Trama. Turmoil. Transformation. 

Fast-paced, spicy, dramatic and tense, “Snow Job: The Great Game” is a tale of one woman’s resilience and servitude, a philosophical blend of a harrowing tale of corruption, contemporary memoir, suspense and erotica. 

Inspired by the life experiences of its author, “Snow Job: The Great Game” delivers the reader headlong into the high-octane world of international high finance and business interests, and gives a startling insight into the influence of Russian money in the modern-day Great Game. Serving as both delicious entertainment and a stark warning, Ferchenko reveals how greed can inhibit our own sense of right and wrong, how people and relationships can be used solely for gain, and how those with power can easily be corrupted. 

When young associate Katya Kuznetsova is made redundant from Lehman Brothers in London, she relocates to Moscow to start a new job at the Swiss Bank. Haunted by her childhood insecurities and desperate to succeed, she flirtatiously throws herself into this high-flying world and is soon seduced by the money, promotions and glamorous lifestyle, which consume her every waking moment. 

Willingly lured into an extra-marital affair with Russian oligarch and living cliché Akbar Gromov, she is thrust deeper into the world of the super-rich: private jets, designer clothes and exclusive parties. 

As events play out, the allure and excitement start to fade and Katya can no longer suppress the feeling of having become someone’s sordid little property. However, when she confides in her only true friend, financial journalist Richard, she is distraught to have him rebuff her last cry for help, in disgust at how far she has fallen. Caught in a bind between the illusory luxury of this world and her own deep unhappiness, she starts to wonder whether there is something wrong with her – or, perhaps, something wrong with the system. But leaving their world has never been easy. 

Katya will have to draw on all her inner strength to accept responsibility for her actions and overcome her deep psychological traumas if she’s ever going to learn to live with herself. 


Review

I didn't really love this book, but I didn't hate it either. I just have to say, almost every character besides sweet Richard was so absurd that I just couldn't believe people like this could possible exist (but I'm sure they do). It's really hard to like such a shallow and materialistic protagonist but I did admire her charm and tenacity. In the end, this wasn't really the book for me but it was an overall enjoyable.

I received this book through NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.

I received this book through NetGalley in exchange for my honest review. 

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